Construction Equipment Executive Institute

Learn the fundamentals of fleet management from our collection of articles and videos. The best in asset management for the construction equipment professional.

Registration is open for the next Institute, April 16-18, 2019, in Chicago.

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Last month we discussed the need to know how equipment-related transactions flow through the organization and detailed a process for operating costs. We introduced a diagram of how charges flow from the job accounts to the equipment account. This article details a process for owning costs and…
You have heard what people say: If you want to know how something works, just follow the money. Equipment management is no different, and it is useful to trace the flow of funds through an organization in order to understand and communicate how things work. This is the first of two articles that…
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When buying a piece of construction equipment, most managers consider whether they want to purchase extended warranty. Key questions need to be asked—and answered—before making your decision, but unfortunately, it’s not simple.

Let’s review the basics of standard warranty. The standard…

I have, for a number of years, been proposing an economic life or sweet spot calculator based on knowing the equation of the cumulative cost curve. Many managers have successfully used it; others are confused by the concept of cumulative cost and have stayed with their current methodologies.…

The hexagon describing the six basic functions of equipment management has gained quite a following in the industry since it was introduced several years ago. It’s been used to show how management has evolved in recent years, but it can also be used to produce a world-class procedures manual…

Last October, Construction Equipment surveyed its subscribers and published the “Top 3 Challenges Facing Equipment Managers.”  No. 1 was “Not able to replace equipment as needed…

Conflict and tension all too often interfere with good relations between operations—those who use equipment to complete construction on time and on budget—and equipment—those who look after equipment and make sure it achieves its minimum lifecycle cost. It is a precarious relationship because…

 

 

I have the opportunity to work with some great companies and learn from the best. So it is natural that I have a little storehouse of knowledge about what the best companies do when it comes to managing their fleets. I share the following in the hope that you can look at your…

Most of us have suffered through three or four years of misery: low backlogs, marginal company profits, layoffs, shop reductions. As the marketplace rebounds, now is the time to re-think your need for mechanics. I use the term “mechanics” and “technicians” interchangeably. To me, a technician is…

Equipment managers must take a long-term view of the repair/rebuild/replace decision in order to optimize the value of equipment assets over their full life cycle. They should not worry too much about short-term fluctuations; wise investments and wise decisions pay off. Not everyone sees it that…

I have been in the business of writing these articles, presenting courses, and developing the art and science of equipment management for a long time. Nothing has had as much impact on day-to-day equipment operations as the work I have…

Our goal is to manage our equipment fleet so that we eliminate unplanned downtime. The primary reason to operate your own shop is to control the quality and timeliness of the various services, so you can better control your downtime. It’s usually not to save money, although in your own shop you…

The mood in a recent meeting discussing the impact that the implementation of air-quality regulations would have on the market value of used Tier-4 equipment was pretty glum. The feeling was that the new generation of complex and more expensive machines would not be as keenly sought after in…

We all know that breakdowns cost a lot more than the parts and labor needed to fix the machine and return it to work. We know that there are consequential costs—or, as we will call them in this article, impact costs—associated with breakdowns and that these often dominate thinking when it comes…

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