Equipment Type

Take the "Feel" out of Brake Inspection

Typically, truck drivers rely on "feel" to determine if air brakes are working properly—especially with the widespread use of automatic slack adjusters.

January 01, 2003

Typically, truck drivers rely on "feel" to determine if air brakes are working properly—especially with the widespread use of automatic slack adjusters. This kind of guesswork has proved ineffective, considering that brakes in need of adjustment is the most-cited out-of-service violation.

Now, with Brake Sentry's Visual Brake Stroke Indicator, checking brake adjustment can be done visually, using the applied-stroke method. Here's how the product works:

Brakes ReleasedBrakes Released: The indicator shows when brakes are not fully releasing. It also prevents road spray from entering the brake chamber.


Brakes AppliedBrakes Applied: The indicator shows brake adjustment and balance. Here, the stroke is within acceptable range.

Repair NeededRepair Needed: With the brakes applied, the indicator clearly shows the stroke is not within the acceptable range.

Since it is made of flexible and unbreakable materials, the indicator is suitable for severe-duty applications on any brake chamber with an external 5/8-inch push rod.

The kits install without special tools in about 3 minutes per wheel, without disassembly of any components. Kits cost $14.95, and quantity discounts are available.

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