Equipment Type

Ring Avulsion? Yes, There's Such a Thing

Though some contractors have “no jewelry” rules on their job sites, a lot of workers still want to wear wedding rings—and no doubt some people reason that since a ring doesn’t hang loosely, there’s little danger. Not so.

January 19, 2017

Note this operator's silicone wedding ring.

If “Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon can catch his wedding ring on the side of a table and nearly rip his finger off (he had to endure extensive surgery in 2015 to repair the damage), then the danger is probably tenfold on a construction site and around equipment.

Though some contractors have “no jewelry” rules on their job sites, a lot of workers still want to wear wedding rings—and no doubt some people reason that since a ring doesn’t hang loosely, there’s little danger.

Not so. Some 150,000 incidents of ring avulsion occur in the U.S. every year. Many of them lead to the loss of a finger.

Two companies have stepped up with solutions. One is Enso, which offers “luxury silicone rings” made of lightweight silicone composite. They’re hypoallergenic and non-toxic. They come in various colors, and in sizes for men and women.

Fixate Designs, a company formed just last November, also sells men’s and women’s silicone rings (“medical-grade” silicone) it says are non-conductive, flexible and non-porous.

These companies provide a simple way for workers to continue to show their commitment to their partners, but in a safe way.

More like this

Comments on: "Ring Avulsion? Yes, There's Such a Thing"

Overlay Init