Equipment Type

Fatal Injury Rate Shows Safety of AWPs

Preliminary data confirm that the machines are one of the safest ways to perform temporary work at height, IPAF says.

August 11, 2015

IPAF is calculating the fatal injury rate for aerial work platforms, and preliminary data confirm that the machines are one of the safest ways to perform temporary work at height, IPAF says.

The fatal injury rate considers the following factors:

  • Estimated rental fleet size, based on the IPAF Powered Access Rental Market Reports
  • Estimated average utilization rates per country and worldwide (utilization rate is defined as the share of the fleet out on rent at any time over a year)
  • Average days worked per year (5 days a week for 50 weeks a year)
  • The number of fatalities involving AWPs in a given year, based on the IPAF accident reporting project

Based on the estimated rental fleet size, the average utilization rate and the average days worked per year, the number of days a rented machine was operated per year was estimated at 168.4 million worldwide for 2013. Taken with the 68 reported AWP fatalities worldwide in 2013, the fatal injury rate (the number of fatalities per 100,000 days a rented machine was operated) was estimated at 0.040. For 2014, the number of days a rented machine was operated per year was 182.4 million and the number of reported MEWP fatalities was 64, to give a fatal injury rate of 0.035.

IPAF compared the AWP fatal injury rate with other existing data on accidents and fatalities worldwide to suggest AWPs to be a safe way to work at height. In the U.S.,  for example, the AWP fatal injury rate in 2013 was 0.03, whereas the fatal injury rate per 100,000 of the workforce due to falls from height was 0.4 (the number of fatalities due to falls from height involving MEWPs was excluded from this figure). The fatal injury rate per 100,000 of the workforce due to fatalities of any kind at work was 3.27 (the number of fatalities involving MEWPs was excluded from this figure).

“We are examining the feasibility of distinguishing between accidents involving rented equipment and those involving end-user owned equipment,” said IPAF CEO Tim Whiteman. “This groundbreaking project is helping us to create relevant safety campaigns and improve our training programs. We would welcome comments and suggestions for improvement.”

Source: IPAF

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