Equipment Type

Civil Work Will Increase

Miscellaneous civil work in Michigan is expected to climb 45.6 percent in 2007 over 2006; however, road construction will drop 38.7 percent in 2007 over 2006. Miscellaneous civil work includes athletic fields and courts; excavating and grading; fencing; flood control; parks and landscaping; sidewalks, curbs, and gutters; site work; and tunnels.

January 08, 2007

Miscellaneous civil work in Michigan is expected to climb 45.6 percent in 2007 over 2006; however, road construction will drop 38.7 percent in 2007 over 2006. Miscellaneous civil work includes athletic fields and courts; excavating and grading; fencing; flood control; parks and landscaping; sidewalks, curbs, and gutters; site work; and tunnels.

Other civil work, which includes water and sewage piping; water and sewage treatment; airport construction; bridges and culverts; dams and canals; and marine work; will be up approximately 4.1 percent in 2007 over 2006.

The Michigan Infrastructure & Transportation Association (MITA) recently reported that $600 million in water and wastewater State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan applications had been submitted for 2007, according to preliminary numbers from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ). The loan amounts were almost three times the 2006 totals.

The dollar figures were so large that they could exceed the state's annual lending capacity by as much as $100 million. Analyses were still being completed at the time of the MITA announcement, but the state estimated that the SRF will lend about $480 million in 2007 compared to awards averaging only $160 million per year over the last three years.

Two major applications of note are a $157-million project in Detroit and a $96-million project in Dearborn.

In addition to these SRF loan applications; there were $76 million in applications from the Drinking Water Revolving Fund (DRWF), which is a 10-percent increase, and $2.3 million from the Strategic Water Quality Initiatives Fund (SWQIF). The state anticipates enough money available in these individual revolving funds to satisfy the demands for 2007.

The future also looks bright for the underground industry, as the state expects applications in the $600-million range each year for at least the next four or five years.

Work on a $53-million sewer construction project in Northeast Macomb County, called the North Gratiot Interceptor, will continue. The project involves construction of more than 15 miles of sanitary sewer lines in three communities through the sale of $53 million in bonds.

Construction recently started on 6-1/2 miles of the project in New Haven and Lenox Township that will provide the two communities with much-needed sewer capacity to accommodate growth in those areas, said Anthony V. Marrocco, Macomb County Public Works Commissioner. Ric-Man Construction, of Sterling Heights, is the general contractor and Spalding DeDecker Associates Inc., of Rochester Hills, is the design engineer.

The two communities, along with Chesterfield Township, petitioned the Macomb County Public Works Commissioner to construct the sewers because existing lines in the area are nearing capacity, and the new interceptors were needed to accommodate current and expected new development, Marrocco said.

"This also helps to prevent pollution because it allows people to disconnect from septic systems in areas where they do not have sanitary sewers," Marrocco pointed out.

A $3.5-million reconstruction of the Leland Township Marina on Lake Michigan in Leland that includes 105 new boat slips, a new marina services building, reconstruction of a parking area, as well as other on-site amenities, began in the fall of 2006 and will be completed in the spring of 2007.

Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME) is serving as the geotechnical engineering consultant and is providing recommendations for site preparation and earthwork, foundations for the new buildings and boat docks, pavement recommendations, engineered fill, and construction considerations. The Abonmarche Group, of Benton Harbor, which provides engineering, architectural, surveying, landscape architecture, and planning services, awarded the contract to SME.

The major portion of the funding for the project has been provided by the Michigan Waterways Commission, which is supported by several revenue sources including Michigan watercraft registration fees and marine fuel taxes.

Misc. Civil Other Civil Roads/Highways Total Civil Buildings Total
2003 $564,647,238 $1,686,599,120 $1,265,496,172 $3,516,742,530 $4,948,261,905 $8,465,004,435
2004 $784,062,780 $1,121,644,995 $1,018,215,502 $2,923,923,277 $5,079,419,101 $8,003,342,378
2005 $253,351,373 $682,001,104 $1,147,144,885 $2,082,497,362 $4,082,135,361 $6,164,632,723
2006 $309,428,914 $809,295,227 $870,284,515 $1,989,008,656 $7,507,288,775 $9,496,297,431
2007 $450,658,089 $842,687,103 $533,422,740 $1,826,767,932 $6,645,919,160 $8,472,687,092


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