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Bowling Lanes Demo'ed For F I-78

Take two of the busiest highways in a state, connect them with an insufficient ramp system, and watch the traffic backups appear. That's how it's been for New Jersey rush-hour drivers ...

February 04, 2008

Take two of the busiest highways in a state, connect them with an insufficient ramp system, and watch the traffic backups appear. That's how it's been for New Jersey rush-hour drivers making the connection between the Garden State Parkway's Exit 142 and Interstate 78 in Union, N.J.

Finally after years of waiting, the exit in Union Twp and Hillside Twp will be upgraded with new ramps that will supply missing movements between the Parkway and I-78. The project was approved in July by the North Jersey Transportation Planning Administration to the tune of $178 million, and is part of the agency's $9.7-billion Transportation Improvement Program set to stretch until 2011. This project will provide for the construction of two missing ramps at the Garden State Parkway Interchange 142 with I-78 to provide the movement from the Garden State Parkway northbound to I-78 westbound and the Garden State Parkway southbound to I-78 eastbound.

Left and below: To do the demolition of the 60,000-square-foot Garden State Bowl lanes in Union, Two Bros. used a John Deere 330LC and a 270LC, both fitted with Geth grapples. It took about three weeks to rip the place to shreds.

To make way for the project, Two Brothers Contracting demolished the shuttered Garden State Lanes, which hadn't seen a strike thrown in over a year. According to Sal Mladenovic, president of Two Brothers, the turnpike authority acquired the property and had hired his firm to do the demolition of the 60,000-square-foot facility. "We're helping them expand the on-ramp so the Parkway doesn't get backed up."

The job began with a 1.5-week asbestos abatement project, which Two Bros. performed. Then using a John Deere 330LC excavator and a 270LC excavator, both fitted with Geth grapples, it took about three additional weeks to rip the place to shreds and cart away the debris. Two Brothers used its own 100-yard walk-in containers and 55-yard dump trailers. The wood waste, including wood roof trusses, was shipped to a Waste Management transfer station. All of the building's concrete block walls were recycled in a nearby Tilcon yard. Project engineer PMK designated the building's slab to remain as part of the base for a new I-78 ramp.

"Everybody's pretty happy to see it go down. It's been an eyesore for so many years," adds Mladenovic. Based in Clifton, N.J., Two Brothers' fleet includes six hydraulic excavators, a wheel loader, seven Bobcat skid-steer loaders, and an ASV-brand low-ground-pressure tracked machine purchased used at a recent Alex Lyons & Sons equipment auction.

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